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  • MONARO RURAL FIRE SERVICE - 11 Geebung Street, Polo Flat, Cooma NSW
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With the rain comes grass, create and maintain a Asset Protection Zone (APZ) around your property. Whilst mowers, whipper snippers and slashers do a fantastic job, stock can be better. If you are lucky enough to be in this situation, use them. ... See MoreSee Less

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2247 wethers on 10 acres for two days did a top job of cleaning up the house paddock

MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT
MONARO HWY X KELLY ROAD, MICHELAGO
HIGHWAY CLOSED IN BOTH DIRECTIONS

Update at 4.27pm- Emergency Services are still on-scene and will be for many hours to come. The highway is likely to remain closed until the early hours of tomorrow morning. Please refer to the Live Traffic App for updates on the highway's status through tonight.

Emergency Services, including the Michelago Rural Fire Brigade, are currently in attendance at a serious motor vehicle accident at this location, which involves a truck and 2 cars.
The Monaro Hwy is closed in both directions, and is expected to remain closed for a significant time.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

My thoughts and prayers are with everyone involved please drive safely

Fingers crossed all are OK- thoughts to all involved 💜

Matt Betts would there be a way round this?

Trevor Stilling

Pam Kimber

Sirena Brace-Clarke

Kayley Keavey

Emma West Brooklin Harwood

Leanne Fisher Shannon Fisher

Thanks for the updates

Colleen St Clair

Annie Priestly maybe check in the morn live traffic app xx

Danial John Morton

Bobeyan Rd is open but busy, very wet and plenty of potholes. Just came through that way to Canberra

Debbie Hollis Sam Sergi

Marg Searle

Kylie Cord

Passed on from anyone picking up people off the Eden bus at Cooma tonight, the bus as far as my app says is diverting through Braidwood.

Teresa Irwin

Sam Foxton Lauren Morrison

Harold Dodds

Sue Walker Bruce Walker

Isabel Roach

Carly Swan Andrew Swan

Tim Regan

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African Lovegrass has been a ongoing problem for land owners and fire fighters. If you have this weed around your house, establish a Asset Protection Zone by keeping the grass short. Consult Snowy Monaro Regional Council weed officers on the best solution for a long term management plan.WEED OF THE WEEK – AFRICAN LOVEGRASS
We’re into the fourth week of our campaign to share important information on our region’s priority weeds. This week we’re focusing on African Lovegrass.

As we head into the warmer months, Snowy Monaro Regional Council is calling on all community members to get to know our region’s priority weeds so we can understand how to play our part to protect our environment, help our farmers and support our community.

The impact of weeds on natural vegetation can be devastating and is estimated to cost the NSW economy about $1.8 billion annually (NSW Department of Industry, 2018).

What is African lovegrass?
African Lovegrass (Eragrostis curvula) is a perennial grassy weed that grows in clumps up to 1.2m tall. It is native to Southern Africa and while it is now the dominant pasture species in parts of NSW and the Snowy Monaro region, it is yet to establish in many areas. Significant resources are being invested into protecting these areas from invasion.

African Lovegrass occurs in townships, along roadsides, in bushland areas and on public and privately owned land. It invades native and introduced pastures and quickly dominates a pasture if not managed. It was accidentally introduced into Australia sometime before 1900 and its distribution has rapidly expanded since – particularly in recent decades and notably after periods of extended drought.

African Lovegrass thrives on acidic, sandy soils with low fertility. It is heat and drought tolerant. Frost can damage it, but it regrows in warmer weather.

There are also some native Lovegrass (Eragrostis) species found in Australia.

Why is African Lovegrass a problem?
• It is highly invasive and quickly crowds out native plants as well as useful pasture.
• Agricultural production can be significantly disadvantaged in areas with heavy infestations of African lovegrass, requiring increased investment in pasture renovation and supplementary winter feeding.
• When mature, African lovegrass forms a dense monoculture with little grazing value. On the Monaro, it becomes frost affected and is dormant in winter, offering no grazing value.
• It is a prolific producer of seed and outcompetes native and improved pasture in many conditions.
• African lovegrass seeds are spread in contaminated fodder, on bicycles, vehicles and equipment and by native animals and livestock.
• Water from ground run-off and flood events can easily transport seeds downstream and across the landscape.
• It is highly flammable when dry and dense infestations pose a major fire hazard to infrastructure and communities.

What can you do?

Prevention
To reduce the chance of African Lovegrass establishing you can:
• maintain strong, competitive pastures and avoid unnecessary soil disturbance
• avoid introducing hay, grain, or silage from known African Lovegrass areas
• monitor vehicle parking areas and livestock feeding areas for germinations of new weeds
• restrict animal and vehicle movements from infested areas into clean paddocks
• quarantine new stock in an area that can be easily monitored and treated for germinating plants
• clean vehicles, mowers and machinery before coming onto your property
• revegetate bare ground and disturbed areas

Control
• Learn to identify and effectively control African Lovegrass
• Search your property, driveway and tracks for new germinations of African Lovegrass
• Monitor utilities easements and high traffic areas for emerging weeds
• If you have a small number of plants to control, remove the seed heads before digging out or spraying
• Control mature plants year round, with extra effort in spring before flowering
• Monitor and treat seedlings, particularly around summer storm periods. Untreated plants will rapidly mature and produce viable seeds
• Regularly monitor treated areas for new germinations - some seeds remain viable for up to 17 years
• Download the free NSW WeedWise app for detailed information on how to identify and manage local priority weeds. www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/weeds
• Visit Council’s website to understand how we can help you with weed management. www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/140/Biosecurity-and-Weeds
• Visit the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) website for information on weed control methods. www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/weeds/weed-control

Contact Snowy Monaro Regional Council if you have any questions regarding weeds on your property or in your neighbourhood. Call 1300 345 345 to be connected to our Biosecurity Officers who specialise in weed management.
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African Lovegrass has been a ongoing problem for land owners and fire fighters. If you have this weed around your house, establish a Asset Protection Zone by keeping the grass short. Consult Snowy Monaro Regional Council weed officers on the best solution for a long term management plan.

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Thanks for the share.

Photos from NSW RFS Area Command South Eastern's post ... See MoreSee Less

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This is a really good idea. Look forward to the final modelling and mapping. Thanks to all for coming to Berridale FCC and bringing us up to speed.😎

Session three was held last week, an introduction to the new Generation Bush Fire Risk Management Plan process. All senior Rural Fire Brigade fire fighters will be meeting this coming Saturday at their respective Control Centres across the Monaro to start reviewing the existing data and adding the most important component being local knowledge and experience to these plans. ... See MoreSee Less

Session three was held last week, an introduction to the new Generation Bush Fire Risk Management Plan process. All senior Rural Fire Brigade fire fighters will be meeting this coming Saturday at their respective Control Centres across the Monaro to start reviewing the existing data and adding the most important component being local knowledge and experience to these plans.Image attachmentImage attachment

Photos from NSW RFS Area Command South Eastern's post ... See MoreSee Less

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Comment on Facebook

There obviously tassies that migrated.have a good season. 👍

Photos from NSW RFS Area Command South Eastern's post ... See MoreSee Less

Here's a hot tip... if you've got horses, make them part of your bush fire survival plan. Including your animals and livestock in your plans will reduce stress when there's a fire, allow clearer thinking and improve the chances of keeping you and your livestock safe.

Here are some questions to ask...

- Are you able to sufficiently care for your stock for 3-7 days, or longer in a prolonged fire emergency?
- Are your feed/fodder supplies sufficient, safe and accessible for
your livestock?
- Do you have a safe place on your property for livestock?
- Are animal houses/sheds protected?
- Do you have basic medical supplies and rescue equipment?

Check our fact sheet for more info delivr.com/2cxys
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Emergency Information

If you see smoke and there’s no fire truck or firefighters, call Triple Zero. Check here for information on what to do during a fire emergency to keep you and your family safe.

Major Fire Updates

When there are fires which threaten where you live, the NSW RFS may issue an alert or warning. You can find our latest Major Fire Updates here.

Fires near me

Get information on current bush fires and other incidents across NSW, as well as warnings for fires which may affect where you live.

Get ready for a bush fire

There are four simple steps to making a bush fire survival plan. Make yours today.

Contact Monaro RFS

Please email us with any queries or concerns. We will get back to you ASAP.

Fire Control Centres & Staff

Monaro Fire Control Centres phone numbers and addresses.

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